s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

"So far, it's been relatively small investors," he said.

Sachen did not disclose how much capital he has raised, but said he has enough to fund three more charging stations and is working on raising funds for the next three. Charging stations can cost between $30,000 and $150,000, he said.

Sunspeed Enterprises, based in Point Reyes Station, operates like a nimble startup. The company includes Sachen, architect Ken Coker, an intern and a few contractors to help with installation of the charging stations.

This is Sachen's second venture. He founded a computer hardware company, Lady Bug Electronics, in 2002. The company, which made dual monitor computer stands and sold about 100 to San Jose State University, folded in 2004 and Sachen went to work for Petaluma-based Xandex. He launched Sunspeed shortly after he was laid off from Xandex in December 2012.

Sachen said Sunspeed will make money from selling charging time to drivers and selling video ads that will run on the charging stations.