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After rejecting one version of the plant, the Board of Supervisors approved a modified plan in December 2010 that anticipated an annual production of up 570,500 tons of asphalt and rock material and 145,000 annual truck trips.

Supervisors Mike Kerns, Paul Kelley and Efren Carrillo voted for project. Kerns and Kelley were in their final weeks of service on the board at the time.

Supervisor Shirlee Zane and then-Supervisor Valerie Brown, the board chairwoman, voted against the plant.

Opponents filed their lawsuit a month later, saying that Dutra and the county failed to address public health and environmental impacts of the facility. They also argued that the approval was rushed through the review process in violation of open meeting laws.

Although the plant is outside city limits, Petaluma joined the lawsuit as a co-plaintiff after community members pledged to donate $10,000 to the city's general fund to help offset legal fees for continued appeals.

Aimi Dutra said there are still some regulatory approvals necessary before construction could begin.

"We look forward to continuing to work with the county and the local community to bring this project to reality," she said. "We're going to be moving ahead this year...now that we have the green light. We hope to bring this to fruition by the end of this year."

(You can reach Staff Writer Lori A. Carter at 762-7297 or lori.carter@pressdemocrat.com.)