s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 5 of 15 free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read 10 of 15 free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Support local journalism and get unlimited access to PressDemocrat.com, the eEdition and our mobile app, all starting at 99 cents per month.
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
Ooops! You're out of free articles. Starting at just 99 cents per month, you can keep reading all of our products and support local journalism.
Already a subscriber?

Each classroom is divided into groups of about seven to nine students, with one special education teacher and about four teaching aides per group of kids — creating a teacher-to-student ratio of 1:2.

The school employs a speech therapist, occupational therapist, orientation and mobility therapist for those with visual impairments and a marriage and family therapist, and it serves students with a variety of developmental needs, including autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy with developmental disabilities and syndromes like mosaic syndrome and Jacobsen syndrome.

With the new campus and additional space, Briggin said the school will start accepting new students, but it will be a slow process.

Andrea Nielsen, a special education teacher for the younger students at the school, said she sees a tremendous difference in her students, including Ethan, as a result of the community activities they do.

Nielsen said the other part she likes about taking the kids into the community to work and play is that it desensitizes the community a bit in terms of dealing with students and others who appear different or might have different emotional and educational needs, and mitigates what might be intolerance toward such students.

"We have a lot of friends in the community," Briggin said. Bringing Cypress students out to help in the community allows for a different experience for the kids than what they are used to.

"We're teaching the kids how to talk and tie their shoes and some basic things," Briggin said. But by helping to grow and distribute food for the needy, "they're able to give to other people — usually people are giving to them — but here, they can give to their community."

(Contact Annie Sciacca at argus@arguscourier.com)