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My last piece, fatty tuna (toro) was followed by a big mouthful of this Green Valley beauty and the wasabi continued to burn clean.

For my last stop, I ventured across town to a real hot spot on the sushi scene. Owned and run by Chef Steven Tam, Gohan is a very comfortable and upscale sushi restaurant and bar located across from Orchard Supply Hardware in the new center off North McDowell Boulevard.

Right away, a huge plate of rolls passed me by to another table. It looked like a California roll sliced and laid flat but with more. On top was at least an inch of crab meat adorned with black and blue roe (fish eggs). Steve calls this one the Carburetor.

For Gohan, I chose the Ironhorse 2006 chardonnay. Cold and crisp and with no oak, it still somehow poured into my mouth as a slightly creamy chardonnay. The minerality was soft, the lemon and pit fruit, opulent but, most importantly, it was gentle and caressing.

My first dish was a specialty: fresh, thin-sliced halibut in carpaccio style, laid out like a confident, winning hand of poker, its owner giving mixed signals not to give away the success that lay below. On the bottom were paper-thin cucumber slices and, for a topper, paper-thin jalapeno slices. This was so tasty with this chardonnay.

Next, I was dribbling fresh cut lemon over a nice plate of a half-dozen myagi oysters that lay in the shell with some Lake Sonoma Sauvignon blanc and a yuzu sauce adorned with green and blue caviar and slices of green onion. I grabbed the first mollusk and pulled the meat from the shell into my mouth. Flavors raced wildly from the acid in the sauce, the salt of the caviar, a dabble of green onion, the brininess of the oyster, and then the soft, meaty flesh.

At the end, the oyster was creamy, very fresh and bright. Oh yes, the wine ? I grabbed the Ironhorse. Immediately, the creaminess of the oyster met the lemony-orchard fruit and the perfect levels of acidity created a splendor both of palate and mind.

Next came a big, beautiful presentation of Japanese scampi. It lay in a pool of mild-to-rich cr?e sauce. Cooked into it was wakame seaweed. Slices of lemon posed atop this articulated contemporary piece and big shrimp guarded its base.

My first bite was amazing. The scampi was so fresh and the cream sauce just lifted into my mouth and carried the scampi down and into my belly. The minerality of the wine and the cold climate apple flavors in it resonated with the buttery cream sauce, cutting through, covering, unfolding and releasing it into my senses.

Steve insisted on one more piece for a finale: a pancake of shizo leaf (Japanese green tea) topped with halibut, a cream sauce and tobiko (caviar). Again, a hit, a winner, a knockout ? a finalist in any drag race.

Overall, sushi is very good in this town. Having lived in Japan, I can be a harsh critic; I expect the best. The wines I paired with it were phenomenal. To top it off, a wonderful weekend of high-performance and antique cars from all over the country. Petaluma defines what Arthur Fonzarelli once coined as ?cool.?

(Jason Jenkins is the owner of Vine and Barrel, a wine shop at 143 Kentucky St. He offers Wednesday night wine education classes from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturday tastings from 4 to 7 p.m. He can be contacted at 765-1112. The Web site is www.vineandbar rel.com)

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