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In college, Lalicker studied urban planning and environmental studies, but she was always toying with business possibilities. Her early ideas included designing yoga mats, developing an online travel resource for Point Reyes National Seashore and trying to come with a web app that turns your smart phone into a mirror.

Nothing took off like the oysters.

She brought in her sister and her friends to help her shuck. The idea, in the beginning was to have a fun way for her and her friends to make some extra money.

"We were averaging literally maybe one or two events a week. Now, we average seven to ten events a week," Lalicker said.

She declined to discuss The Oyster Girl's revenues, but said the company, which was incorporated earlier this year, achieves an enviable profit margin of 50 percent. What makes such margins possible she said is the wholesale price she gets from her main supplier, the Tomales Bay Oyster Co. She said she harvests her own oysters and volunteers at the farm for many of its events.

The Oyster Girls also get some of its product from the Drakes Bay Oyster Company, the firm fighting a protracted legal battle to continue operating in Point Reyes waters designated as federal wilderness.

Jazmine Lalicker, 25, said The Oyster Girls is part of the popular "farm to table"food movement that has some of its earliest roots in the North Bay.

"I love being able to truly offer something so pure and in its raw form, without having to change anything," she said.

"It's been a pretty exciting experience, working with my sister and creating The Oyster Girls. She's chock full of ideas," she said.

Aluxa Lalicker said the name of the company was an attempt to create something that was fun and personal. She said she and her sister also wanted to highlight the feminine aspect of oysters in an industry she says is dominated by men.

The Lalickers often get dressed up for events. Clients get to pick from a wide range of costumes, with styles that range from America's vintage big band era to formal chef attire and Caribbean carnival motifs.

"They just let us know and we get to go out shopping," Aluxa Lalicker said.

Because the business is such a personal expression, the sisters said they get to do what they want.

"Every idea that we have, since we're it, we're The Oyster Girls, we can just go for it," Jazmine Lalicker said.

(You can reach Staff Writer Martin Espinoza at 521-5213 or martin.espinoza@pressdemocrat.com.)