A majority of respondents to an online Argus-Courier poll said they are against a proposal that would preserve at least 44 acres of open space near Helen Putnam Regional Park and allow up to 28 luxury homes.

Here are some comments:

“Adding these luxury homes will do nothing to help with the problem of low income housing in Petaluma while trampling on one of the few viable open spaces in the Petaluma area. Helen Putnam is a unique treasure and this park should be expanded to include this entire area, rather than adding more unattractive, monster homes.”

“I am a real estate professional, and I am opposed to this development. Not only will it destroy the natural beauty and the habitat of this beautiful parcel, but it will definitely add to the congestion and traffic on our tired streets. D Street is already turning into a freeway for commuters. Where will this traffic go? Traffic is an issue in Petaluma and is getting worse instead of better because there is no a plan in place to resolve.”

“I am not in favor of any development on that property. If it is already decided that there will be some development, then I want the least amount possible.”

“I am not typically in favor of “luxury” development, but I believe these 28 homes are a fair compromise and have provided some avenue for open space preservation. So, in the interest of the ultimate goal I think this is reasonable. It is great to hear that preservation is part of the plan. There are two other high density plans going forward near Corona and on Sonoma Parkway, so that has to be enough until they build the infrastructure to support more homes.”

“I am only in favor of leaving the land as it is now with no development. Once this land is developed, the open space will be gone forever.”

“This has taken longer than the Target. Stop allowing a handful of “not in my backyard” folks stop a reasonable development which will provide a huge property tax base and many local jobs.”

“We are new to Petaluma and one of the many special qualities that drew us here was the sense of living in the country. The addition of these homes, which would only be affordable to the very wealthy, would destroy that sense of peacefulness and joy of the beauty of the natural setting on Windsor drive.”

“We do not need to build any more homes in that area of town.”