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Singing her way to a career in music


From the small town of Petaluma to the large city of Los Angeles, Petaluma High School senior Emily Rossi — under the stage name “Em Rossi” — is making her way onto the stage of stardom after growing up with a heavily-influenced childhood of music.

At 17 years of age, Rossi has been working for the past year on her debut album with a producer and team in L.A., launched her new website and released her new single, “Madness,” from her debut album. Her music has also landed her a gig at The Sessions at Willow Grove on July 29 in Virginia. This event will be taped for Comcast Xfinity On Demand, and Rossi will be the opening act for The Tenors. Along with all of this, Rossi is planning a California concert tour.

“My interest in music came from constantly being around it,” said Rossi. “My dad played guitar, sang and wrote songs. Music was always being played in the background. I naturally started singing. I would learn songs played on the radio and at family parties or sing melodies off the top of my head. I would never stop.”

Rossi’s parents decided to have her work closely with a vocal coach when she was 8 years old to perfect her singing skills.

“She was classically trained — singing Broadway show tunes to build her strength and control,” said Karen Brockman, Rossi’s mother. “By junior high, she wanted to stop with lessons, but promised she would continue to sing. She was very dedicated and practiced every day with different genres and working on different techniques. Singing just comes very natural to her.”

Rossi’s musical career began when she was a freshman in high school, almost by a matter of luck — or fate. As a freshman in high school, she started singing a few songs with a close friend’s band, The Hots.

“My parents videotaped the night,” said Rossi. “A week later, as my parents were out in Carneros Valley, a man came up to them asking for directions. He said he was heading to a studio, which of course perked their interest. The man’s name was Jay King from the group Club Nouveau. He invited all of us to lunch the next day to meet me. I ended up at the studio later that day singing for the whole group. Their lead singer, Samuelle Prater, took me under his wing and taught me to record and create original songs. From there I kept learning and growing, which has gotten me to where I am now.”

Two years ago, Rossi’s father tragically and unexpectedly died. His influence is still alive in Rossi to this very day, driving her to succeed in doing what she loves.

Rossi was connected to her current producer, Jim McGorman, through an artist consultant that she was working with. She and her consultant sent a couple tracks over to McGorman and around a month later, he called and asked to meet Rossi. McGorman works with a lot of young artists, including Avril Lavigne, Michelle Branch, Cassadee Pope, and Marc Broussard.

Rossi co-writes her songs; writing the concepts, almost in the format of a journal, before going into the studio.

“In the studio, I’ll work with my producer on music, melodies and the overall sound of the track. After we figure out the layout of the song, we go back and forth with lyrics,” said Rossi. “It’s a collaborative and creative environment. Another mind to play off of adds more variety and uniqueness to the song. Ideas can come up that you never even thought about trying.”

Rossi’s style of music incorporates jazz, R&B and pop, with elements of modern bands such as Coldplay and The Fray.

Rossi enjoys the ability to lose herself in the melody of a song; letting go of all other thoughts and simply allowing the music to flow through her — and especially the energy of performing in front of a live audience.

“On a professional level, I enjoy expressing myself through my own music. My songs reflect my life and my feelings. I am my own artist,” said Rossi. “I’m singing my songs instead of other artist’s work. I am fortunate to work with such talented musicians, producers and other music makers and supporters. For me creating, singing and sharing music is my passion and love.”

Rossi is currently trying to build her fanbase through social media numbers — those in the music industry look closely at how many people are interested in her on various social media platforms.

To help get the word out, visit Rossi on Facebook (Em Rossi), Twitter and Instagram (emrossimusic) as well. To visit Rossi’s website, go to emrossi.com.

(Contact Kate Hoover at argus@arguscourier.com)